Category Archives: Uncategorized

Crying in my cappuccino

When I had placed my order, I took out my cell phone.

Today I treated myself to breakfast at Mugg and Bean after dropping my granddaughter at Brownies. Drinking my cappuccino, I decided to send a whats app to my youngest son. He left for Russia a week and a half ago.

It’s a great opportunity for him and I know that God has a wonderful plan for his life. When we Skyped last week he was happy, in a great apartment and very excited about the future.

Nevertheless, I found myself crying in my cappuccino as I sent the message. Two weeks ago, I would have invited him to join me. We often have breakfast together. It’s one of the things I shall miss.

Then I got to thinking.  How many other every day happenings will I miss? Ten pin bowling on a Tuesday? Having supper together? The help of a strong man when unpacking groceries or moving furniture? Somebody to fix recalcitrant electronic devices by being “Young at them?”

It made me realise again that I should enjoy life to the full everyday. Today’s everyday occurrences might become tomorrow’s poignant memories. Like taking my granddaughter to Brownies, helping my daughter with the three kids at the school Spring Festival, cooking soup for my wonderful husband.

I know I’m suffering from empty nest syndrome and it happens to all mothers everywhere and there will be times when I cry into my cappuccino. But meanwhile, let me enjoy the little things of life that make life good. Jesus said, “I have come to give you life and life  in all its fullness.” (John 10:10)  Let me not allow my life and the fullness of it to pass me by while I am too busy to notice the little things that might make me cry into my cappuccino in five year’s time.20170826_0910231.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Flash fiction

As an experiment I’m posting a story on my blog.

Windows

300 words

I flop down in the train compartment, grateful that it’s empty. I am pooped! At 65 I no longer have the energy I need for a morning in the city. I close my eyes.

“Hello. What’s your name?”

Where did he come from? I open one eye a slit. A freckle faced boy of about eight is sitting opposite me.

I sigh. Should I pretend to be asleep? I open my eyes reluctantly. “You can call me Granny.” I don’t know where that comes from. It’s not even technically true. My only grandchild died in a car accident eight years ago when my daughter Helen, her husband, Nick, and baby Sebastian were all killed in a head on collision.

I feel the familiar tightening of my throat.

“Aren’t you a bit young to be travelling on the train by yourself?” Really, some parents these days! Anything can happen on a train.

“My Mom doesn’t know I’m here.” He lowers his voice and gives me a conspiratorial grin.

“Are you running away?” I hope my voice doesn’t betray my agitation. I reach into my bag for my cell phone. I need to send a message.

“No. I just want to visit my Granny. She lives in another place.” He looks out the window wistfully.

I must keep him with me until we get to Irene station. I smile. “Tell me about yourself.” I fold my hands in my lap and give him my full attention. “What do you like doing?”

His blue eyes light up. “I love climbing trees and playing soccer with Dad and helping Mom bake brownies -”

A new voice cuts in. I gasp with recognition. “Sebastian, how many times have I told you not to climb through the windows!”

I hear a window shut. I am alone.

 

Soapy Exit

 

When I poured shampoo into the kitchen sink, the squid blew bubbles. By the time the foam cleared, he was gone. I never saw him again.

squid

I am trying to do two challenges with this post. The first is Grammar Ghoul Press’ Shapefitting challenge where we are challenged to write a story in 26 words including the words “kitchen”,”squid” and “shampoo.”

The next is Linda G Hill’s One liner Wednesday. I hope neither of the challenge hosts objects to my trying to kill two birds with one stone (or two squids with one wash).

#1linerWeds badge by nearlywes.com

Lend a helping hand.

“Look Mom,’ it’s trying to escape!” Four year old Nicholas was watching his big brother fly his new kite.

“Mmm!” said Mom. She glanced up from her needlework.

“It looks like a bird. It wants to fly.”

“Mmm!”

Nicholas spied Mom’s sewing scissors.

“Don’t worry, little kite,” he said. “I’ll help you.”

 

This story is in response to this week’s Shapefitting challenge.

What if we are all wrong?

I thought this was a very balanced reaction to what is going on at the moment.

I don’t know how it’s possible to not be affected by the incredible amount of hatred and violence going on around us.
This past weekend was a reminder of the uncertainty of life.
Of the way that one person’s hate can affect so many people.
Of how dark the world we live in can be.
And of course, it is not just in the United States that violence and crime take place. There are news articles everywhere about the violence that is taking place across the world.
Just three months ago, at least 30 people died in Brussels from a bombing, Last November, a shopping complex in Lebanon was attacked killing at least 43 people, also in November was the Paris attack that killed more than 100 people, and now the Orlando attack that has claimed the lives of 50 people.

But here’s the thing about the numbers.
The only…

View original post 788 more words

Trying Something New

I was inspired by Linda G Hill who is involved in so many different things to try my hand at Song Lyric Sunday.

I am coloring outside the lines a bit – firstly today is Monday rather than Sunday and then my lyric is from the 1890’s rather than the 1990s and is full of paradox. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JgDRQVsmI08

This hymn was written by the poet  George Matheson (1842-1906). Despite being almost blind by the age of 18, he became one of the outstanding Scottish Presbyterian ministers of his time. Perhaps his use of paradox arose from his life which was a paradox in itself.

The Lyrics are as follows

1. Make me a captive, Lord,
and then I shall be free.
Force me to render up my sword,
and I shall conqueror be.
I sink in life’s alarms
when by myself I stand;
imprison me within thine arms,
and strong shall be my hand.

2. My heart is weak and poor
until it master find;
it has no spring of action sure,
it varies with the wind.
It cannot freely move
till thou hast wrought its chain;
enslave it with thy matchless love,
and deathless it shall reign.

3. My power is faint and low
till I have learned to serve;
it lacks the needed fire to glow,
it lacks the breeze to nerve.
It cannot drive the world
until itself be driven;
its flag can only be unfurled
when thou shalt breathe from heaven.

4. My will is not my own
till thou hast made it thine;
if it would reach a monarch’s throne,
it must its crown resign.
It only stands unbent
amid the clashing strife,
when on thy bosom it has leant,
and found in thee its life.

 

Pretty Paragraphs – Inserting Drop Caps

I found this so practical and helpful for writers.

Lit World Interviews

The best place to look for information on how to publish your book for paper with CreateSpace is actually in your collection of traditionally published fiction and non-fiction. In their eBook, Building Your Book for Kindle, Amazon suggests both indenting the first sentence of paragraphs and also inserting empty space between paragraphs. A lot of Indies, myself included, made the mistake of using the same system for our paper books.

It’s not the end of the world, and doesn’t look terrible, but the way it’s usually done is either using indents with no spaces between paragraphs – apart from the first paragraphs of every chapter, which are not indented, or having the spaces between, but not indenting any of the paragraphs. Amazon recommend paragraph indents of 0.5” in Kindle books, and again, a lot of us carried that figure over when we formatted for our paper books. It also doesn’t…

View original post 251 more words