Tag Archives: fishermen

Cloves and Bananas

Flavours are important. For breakfast I usually have a bowl of oats. Over the years I’ve made my own tweaks to my oats. I mush up tinned pie apples and add cinnamon and raisins to make a yummy addition. One tablespoon of this and one of yoghurt, mix it into the oats, sprinkle with chopped peanuts and you have oats-a-la-Jenny.

Yesterday my oats tasted funny. I had mixed up a new batch of apple mush the day before. I cast my mind back and tried to think of a reason my oats tasted of cloves instead of cinnamon. I went to the spice cupboard. My spices are arranged alphabetically. Cinnamon first. The bottle was empty. Next powdered cloves. Brown powder. I deduced what had happened.

Cloves can be used to spice apples. Baked apples often have whole cloves stuck into them. But it’s not the same. Luckily it wasn’t cayenne pepper or something. At least my breakfast was still edible.

Isn’t it amazing the different flavours God has created for us to enjoy? Isn’t it wonderful that He has given us the ability to differentiate between them?

Image by Couleur from Pixabay

My granddaughter doesn’t like bananas. I found a recipe on the internet for a healthy chocolate mousse using organic cocoa, avocado and a super ripe banana. My grandson helped me make this as our experimental pudding. He took his sister a taste without telling her the ingredients.

“It tastes like banana,” she said.

Flavours matter.

Jesus said, “You are the salt of the earth. But if the salt loses its saltiness, how can it be made salty again? It is no longer good for anything…” (Matt 5:13 NIV)

He could have said the same about cloves, or bananas. If they lose their flavour, they are not good for anything.

God has called us all to certain things. We have different gifts, different callings.

I’ve been reading the Max Lucado book, In the Eye of the Storm. Today I read how, as a teenager, he had asked a friend to join him and his father on a fishing holiday. They couldn’t fish because of the rainy, icy, sleety weather. Cooped up together in a camper, he discovered flaws he hadn’t noticed in his friend before and even in his father. He says, “When those who are called to fish don’t fish, they fight.” Maybe that’s true of all of us. If we don’t do what God has called us to do, we lose our flavour.

I believe I am called to write. My spiritual gift is encouragement. What happens when I don’t write, when I don’t encourage? I fritter my time away on other things. I search the internet for bargains on the things I covet but can’t afford. I spend time on my cell phone allowing other people’s opinions to influence my mind. I laze around feeling depressed and even headachy.

I know life is a balance between various aspects, but I pray that I might never lose my flavour.

My prayer

Dear Lord Jesus, thank you for the gifts you have endowed me with, for my calling and my ministry. Please help me keep close to You that I may never lose my flavour. Amen.

Fishermen

We have a beautiful view of the sea from the Beach House where we are staying. The dominant features at the moment are fishermen. The fishermen I’ve always thought about from the bible were the kind who go out in fishing boats, cast out their nets, drag the nets behind the boat to the beach and then haul in the catch. The stories of Jesus make me think of large catches but sometimes they also fished all night and caught nothing.

The fishermen in our view use rods, and then there are various skill levels. Over the weekend, there were crowds, including families where older men demonstrated the art of patience to the teenagers who tended to cast a line into the sea, haul it in, throw it out again and after about three attempts pack up and move to another area.

Today there seems to be a group of professionals. They’ve been here since before sunrise. I’ve watched some of them pull out three or four fish on one line.

Yesterday I was wondering what my main calling was. I think the point is, it’s not necessarily what we do but the attitude in which we do it that pleases God.

Colossians 3:23 says:

Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for human masters, since you know that you will receive an inheritance from the Lord as a reward. It is the Lord Christ you are serving. (NIV)

Whether a fisherman is fishing for fun on the weekend, to provide food for his family or to sell, if he does it as unto the Lord, he will receive a reward from the Lord. If I involve Jesus in everything I do, even cooking or housework, and work as unto Him, I don’t need to stress about whether I should be writing or doing ministry or anything else. I merely need to stay close to Him and attuned to His leading.

In our fellowship group we are working through a series called Fruitfulness on the Frontline by Mark Greene. He pointed out in session three that God only made humans on the sixth day. He spent the other five preparing for man. He created order, made provision, brought joy and beauty and released potential. If what we do works towards any of those outcomes, we are doing God’s work.

Lord, whatever I do, be it large or infinitesimal, easy or difficult, may I dedicate it to you and work as unto you. Thank you. Amen.